About your Search

20100928
20100928
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that fac
, especially in the '60s and '70s, it was a extremely political newspaper magazine that used music to bring in an audience. so, my question, what about the new journalists today reaching out to the 20-year-old and 30- year-old? your comment about the two schools of journalism and reaching out, getting quality journalism to the public, how will we do that? >> we have a couple of issues here. the old school and the new school. i guess the question would be -- is there a standard? a single standard anymore for journalism? >> i do not know who sets that standard anymore. frightening, sometimes, to hear the fact that the most trusted name in news is jon stewart. but who can argue that there is not some good quality reporting and information that goes on on a show like that? i think it will be far reaching. we have young people, both in print and on the internet. it is a wide range of opportunity. i do not know that there is any one standard today that anyone could point to that would be the single source. >> what about the chronicle right now? reducing $1 million per week, what does that look li
. >> thank you for watching. join us for future episodes. you can >> welcome to culturewater. in 2001, the san francisco arts commission and tampa does go public library established an arts master plan for the city soon to be renovated branch library. almost 10 years later, the san francisco arts commission has integrated a collection of vibrant new artworks by bay area artists into five new libraries, and there is more on the way. here is a closer look at some of the projects. >> the branch library improvement program is a bond funded program undertaken by the san francisco public library to upgrade each of the branch libraries throughout the neighborhoods. one of the great benefits of this opportunity is that each of these branches has a unique artwork that has been created specifically for that branch, based on input from people who live near that branch, in the surrounding neighborhood. >> trur- minded. there was a lot of community support for the project. i try to make it about the true hill and its history. they were something that natives used for making houses. the constructio
suggested a few years ago. climate change is upon us. it is happening fast. those of us who live in coastal areas will fill the affect of that first. we want to recognize the mayor's leadership in not just the opportunity of building such an important structure -- this is the first leed certified hospital in the state of california, and what that means is the rebuilding of the entire campus is to provide respect, dignity, and validation for all of the residents who will be here at laguna honda, but next importantly that we build something that will come from its conception, enhance the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if w
're in a special use district of any kind or redevelopment area of any kind? >> i don't believe we developed there anymore. >> because the thing that comes up for me commissioners, is -- is the underserved nature of the location. the fact that it doesn't have grocery stores convenient grocery stores, that it does not have convenient. i -- i mean -- >> can i make a correction to that. it does. saveway is right in the area. >> three blocks. >> three blocks away. >> because -- for me public transportation, i mean i can just imagine what it is for an elder person relying on public transportation to take them back and for the across town and something that is within walking distance. >> that will be different, though, once the legislation is enacted in terms of -- of access to -- to a -- you know a pharmaceutical because -- if this legislation is enacted then saferway will no longer be able to sell pharmaceuticals. it would be back to a --, a walgreen's or a -- or a independent drugstore. >> okay, thank you. >> what about -- what about some kind of financial ceiling on gross receipts? like -- sto
nationwide hired through this money. close to half are used -- youth, in fact. we started in may. we were one of the first on board. mayor newsom would go to the u.s. conference of mayors, and he would tell the we had this great program. my office kept getting calls. we have been talking to states and localities all over the country and really, due to the mayor's leadership, this 250,000 no. i think is largely attributed to that. robert miller, who is here, one of our early partners with jobs now, well over 150 employees -- 145 employees through jobs now. he will talk about that, but he will talk about this innovative online campaign he has got going to get this thing extended. robert miller. >> i'm director of veterinary archives, and i want to thank mayor newsom for having the fortitude, the foresight, and the temerity to stay with a program for the very beginning -- since the very beginning. he took a chance on main street. we want to take that chance on government. our first higher was in june 2009, and our last was yesterday, the last day before the door closed. we believe the program be
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6